hcoates's blog

Readings on research ethics and scientific integrity

Over the past few months, I have been delving into the literature on research ethics, scientific integrity, the responsible conduct of research, whatever your preferred term may be. The fact is that there isn't much clarity in the research on how research is conducted, prioritized, funded, disseminated, and evaluated. Much of my work in providing data services comes back to this notion of data integrity and the integrity of the scholarly record. While I am no philosophy of science or history of science expert, I find this discussion fascinating. The conversation about how politics and culture shape research is one that every undergraduate and graduate student doing research in higher education institutions should be exposed to.

Updated Oct 13, 2015 by hcoates

Lessons learned, reflecting on 2014

Like many faculty across campus, I am in the process of completing my FAR (faculty annual review). This product is something created solely for university purposes and only slightly overlaps with my personal process for reflecting on the previous year and planning for the next. I'm going to skip past the criticisms of the system to get to my point - that this process exists to help us improve. Most of the year, I rush from deadline to deadline, rarely meeting or exceeding my own expectations in this frantic pursuit of accomplishment. Last year in particular, this feeling was prevalent. Looking back, I am proud of what I accomplished but not of the path I chose to get there. This year, I resolve to do better, to achieve a better balance of work, home, and social life. These are some of the things that have inspired me and tools I will be trying out. I hope these are helpful for those of you who, like me, are not entirely satisfied with how your life progressed in 2014.

Updated Jan 15, 2015 by hcoates

An interesting case statement from the Research Data Alliance: the BioSharing Registry

A working group of the Research Data Alliance has proposed a case statement to develop the BioSharing Repository into a registry. Admittedly, I wasn't clear about the distinction until I read through the report a couple of times. Now that I have a better understanding of what the working group is trying to accomplish, I am eager to see how this plays out and if it can adapted in other fields. Personally, I can attest to how hard it is to find relevant standards and repositories for a particular research project. There are simply too many to know and no good way to find the ones that you or your colleagues don't know.

Updated Aug 22, 2014 by hcoates

IUPUI data bootcamp for librarians & library staff

University Library will be hosting an informal data bootcamp next month to help librarians and library staff become more comfortable working with data and in talking about library data services with faculty, staff, and students. Registration is now open (link below). Feel free to attend some or all of the sessions, depending on your interests. Your instructors will be Heather Coates, Ted Polley, and Eric Snajdr.

Date: Tuesday, July 9

Time: 1:00pm - 4:30pm

Location: University Library, Room 2120


Updated Jun 19, 2014 by hcoates

Finding and reusing data for your research

You already know that the libraries on campus, including University Library, provide you with access to a wealth of information: journals, databases, books, and tools to help you manage information. We also provide instructional support and one-on-one consultations. What you may not know is that we can also help you find data for your senior research project, master's thesis, dissertation project, or your latest funding award. Some of the best and least known resources are below, but contact your subject librarian if you need help navigating them. This list is not comprehensive, so ask us for help if you can't find what you need!

Open Data

Updated May 01, 2014 by hcoates

Strategies to get a handle on all your digital stuff: Project planning and management

Admittedly, I spend more time thinking about project management than I would like, sometimes to the detriment of actually getting stuff done. On the other hand, I have realized that the processing through the organizational issues helps me to map out and articulate what it will take to complete a particular project. Since I've found the workflows and tools posts from other professionals helpful, I'll share my approach and hope that this helps someone else besides me.

Project planning

I tend to take on too many projects, mostly of my own creation, so I try to inject a dose of realism into the scoping process. This helps me to figure out if I can actually accomplish what I want and helps to determine the timeframe. This sounds more formal than it really is. Basically, I try to sketch out the following on a single page:

Updated Mar 24, 2014 by hcoates

Strategies to get a handle on all your digital stuff: Personal Knowledge Management

Like most academics, I have too much digital stuff – a personal library of resources related to my work, files for various projects in progress, files for completed projects, and miscellaneous files accumulated through service activities, university/campus/school initiatives, not to mention the personal files I have at home. 

Updated Feb 25, 2014 by hcoates