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IUPUI Faculty Taking Advantage of the Digital Scholarship Fund

A few years ago Dean Lewis implemented a fund to assist faculty who are interested in developing digital collections that will enhance and advance their research agenda.  Faculty can use the fund to explore new modes of analysis, creation and dissemination where technology plays a significant role. 

Faculty Highlight

In 2011 I began working with Dr. Bob White to create an online and open-access collection that offers resources for students, teachers, and scholars that are interested in Irish History, Irish politics, social movements, political activism, and “terrorism.”

According to Dr. White, “The Irish Republican Movement Collection provides unique resources for the understanding the transformation of Provisional Irish Republicanism and for understanding those who opposed that transformation, including contemporary ‘dissident’ Irish Republicans."

The collection includes 4 Irish Newspapers and a streaming video created by Dr. White. 
http://ulib.iupui.edu/digitalscholarship/collections/IrishRepublicanMovement

Last updated by jdodell on 04/03/2014

Strategies to get a handle on all your digital stuff: Project planning and management

Admittedly, I spend more time thinking about project management than I would like, sometimes to the detriment of actually getting stuff done. On the other hand, I have realized that the processing through the organizational issues helps me to map out and articulate what it will take to complete a particular project. Since I've found the workflows and tools posts from other professionals helpful, I'll share my approach and hope that this helps someone else besides me.

Project planning

I tend to take on too many projects, mostly of my own creation, so I try to inject a dose of realism into the scoping process. This helps me to figure out if I can actually accomplish what I want and helps to determine the timeframe. This sounds more formal than it really is. Basically, I try to sketch out the following on a single page:

Last updated by hcoates on 03/24/2014

Exploring OER

Last week, I helped lead a workshop for humanities faculty on campus who were looking for ways to document their impact for P&T purposes. While the workshop mostly focused on documenting traditional forms of scholarship (journal articles, books, etc.), I encouraged faculty to consider documenting their teaching impact as well. By openly sharing learning objects – syllabi, assignments, classroom activities – or teaching materials (e.g., textbooks, online tutorials, presentations), faculty can transform teaching in their field. Imagine if there were a peer-reviewed open introductory textbook to writing. Imagine, if it were well done, how much it would be used and shared. 

Last updated by lacym on 03/18/2014

My Thoughts about the FIRST Act: Public Access is Not Enough

Many scholars and librarians support public access to research publications funded by U.S. taxpayers. It's hard to argue with the idea that the people who paid for this research have a right to read the results without having to pay a third party (often a commercial publisher) for access. But, in making the case for open access to research published by faculty working at a public university, I sometimes meet supporters of public access that assume the access problem has been solved by federal policy. Reader, we have a problem.

Last updated by jdodell on 03/14/2014

New Open Access Journals on the Horizon from Two Major Scientific Societies

A couple of interesting developments have occurred in the world of open access scientific publishing in the last few weeks.  Two major scientific societies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Royal Society, have both announced plans to publish open access journals.  The AAAS plans to debut their new open access journal, Science Advances, in 2015 while the Royal Society‘s new open access journal, Royal Society Open Science, is due to begin this year.

Last updated by esnajdr on 03/04/2014

Creating Cultural Heritage and Faculty Research Digital Collections: Less about process and more about human interaction

The evolution of creating a digital project includes various steps moving from project idea to digital collection.  While the idea to digitize is simple in theory, there are different ways to approach the digitization process. The creation of a massive digitization project is markedly different than that of a cultural heritage institution collection or faculty research project.  The goal of mass digitization is not to create collections but to digitize everything, or in this case, every book every printed (Colye, 2006). The creation of digital collections for cultural heritage institutions and faculty research projects is less about the methodology of digitization and more about the human interaction between the partnering institutions.  The interaction becomes a personal journey of selection and description of materials that strives to capture and provide online access to the history of the institution.

Last updated by jdodell on 02/26/2014

Strategies to get a handle on all your digital stuff: Personal Knowledge Management

Like most academics, I have too much digital stuff – a personal library of resources related to my work, files for various projects in progress, files for completed projects, and miscellaneous files accumulated through service activities, university/campus/school initiatives, not to mention the personal files I have at home. 

Last updated by hcoates on 02/25/2014

Students are Knowledge Creators, Not Just Consumers

Information literacy—the ability to recognize when information is needed and find, evaluate, and use the needed information—is essential to our higher education goals. We want our students to leave college with the ability to direct their own learning and teach themselves, especially since it will be impossible for them to learn everything about their discipline in four years.

Information literacy outcomes addressed in the classroom often focus on where to find information and how to evaluate it. In other words, information literacy skills, when they are taught, usually position the student as an information consumer. But students are also content creators—they write papers, create poster presentations, compose works of art. But, rarely are they told the story of how knowledge is shared in their discipline and why. And rarely do they recognize themselves as creators of new knowledge. Thus, it is our job as educators to make sure they feel invited into the conversation.

Last updated by lacym on 02/21/2014

Developing a DPLA Hub in Indiana

The Beginnings

In Spring 2013 a survey was sent to organizations in Indiana that were known to already be creating digital collections related to Indiana history.  Responding were libraries, museums, historical societies, and archives.  The overwhelming feedback indicates that Indiana cultural heritage institutions are highly interested in continuing to talk about a Digital Public Library of America Service Hub in Indiana.

What is DPLA?

Last updated by klpalmer on 02/14/2014

"Open Access," is it a Proper Noun?

Recently I've noticed a tendency in my prose to capitalize the words "Open Access." Somehow my mind turned a concept into a brand. I had some help, of course. For a shorthand, many that write about open access use the initialism "OA." It's easy to see how that might introduce capitalization when it comes time to spell out both words--so, "open access" becomes "OA" which is reborn as "Open Access." And, then, many fine OA advocates have worked to make Open Access a brand. With manifestos, conferences, books, and the ever present icon, Open Access is a brand--and that's a good thing too. Without all of this attention (scholarly articles, library flyers, t-shirts, and Internet marketing) many would fail to consider the benefits of open access practices; many more would assume that OA is merely something offered by big name publishers at the steep price tag of $3,000 per article. (Yes, even the subscription publishers are cashing in on the Open Access brand.)Open Access Icon    

Last updated by jdodell on 02/13/2014