Workshops offered by the Center for Digital Scholarship

Data Visualization Workshop series

Description: This series is designed to be taken together, for a foundational understanding of data visualization, or individually to suit individuals’ needs. Each workshop is interactive, including hands-on examples that have participants creating their own visualizations. With the exception of Microsoft Excel, the series will focus on open-source or freely available software. Attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops.

Audience: Faculty, graduate students

Instructor: Ted Polley

A Primer on Data Visualization

Description: This workshop introduces the basics of data visualization, including best practices for how to create your own visualizations. Participants will learn how to visually encode different data types and create their own visualizations by hand using provided sample data. No laptop is required for this session.

Basics of Charts & Graphs

Description: This workshop covers the basics of charts, graphs, and how to clearly communicate data with simple graphics. Attendees will learn which chart or graph best suits their data, as well as some common mistakes to avoid. A portion of the session will be devoted to hands-on work, with provided sample data. A basic familiarity with Microsoft Excel is strongly recommended. No computers will be provided and participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops.

*Pre-requisites: Familiarity with Microsoft Excel

An Introduction to Geospatial Visualization

Description: Attendees will get a broad overview of the topic, learn how to obtain data, and create a region-shaded map using Census data. Participants will work with QGIS (http://www.qgis.org/en/site/), a free and open-source program for geospatial analysis. Computers will not be provided, and attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops. Instructions for how to download and install QGIS will be sent to registered participants prior to the session.

*Pre-requisites: Familiarity with Microsoft Excel

Network Visualization

Description: Attendees will learn about basic network structures and several analysis techniques. Hands-on examples will be covered using Sci2 (https://sci2.cns.iu.edu/user/index.php) and Gephi (https://gephi.org/), both free and open-source programs for network analysis and visualization. Computers will not be provided, and attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops. Instructions for how to download and install Sci2 and Gephi will be sent to registered participants prior to the session.

Make Your Work Count Series to support faculty advancement

Description: This series is designed to help faculty increase the impact of their work. It can be offered as two 90-minute sessions or 4 45-minute sessions.

Audience: Faculty of all ranks at IUPUI

Instructors: Heather Coates, Jere Odell, Caitlin Pike

Own a Profile (45 minutes)

Description: In this workshop, we will introduce simple strategies for creating your online identity by developing a profile. An online profile with the right information increases the visibility of your work in search results and helps you to find collaborators, promote your work, and track your impact. We will provide examples and support to help you build and maintain your profile in Google Scholar and ORCID.

Share Freely (45 minutes)

Description: Once you have created an online profile, the next steps is to share your work and connect it to your profile. This will make it easier for others to find your work and can help you claim your area of expertise. This session will help you choose the tools that are right for your work. We will demonstrate how these tools work with online profiles and enable tracking of metrics for how people engage with and use your scholarly products.

Gather Evidence (45 minutes)

Description: Faculty must provide strong evidence of impact in order to achieve promotion and tenure. Having strong evidence in year 5 is made easier by proactively disseminating your workfrom the start. In this hands-on workshop, we will introduce key sources of evidence to support your case, demonstrate strategies for gathering this evidence, and provide a variety of examples. These sources include citation metrics, item-level metrics, and altmetrics as indicators of impact to support your narrative of excellence.

Make Your Case (45 minutes)

Description: This session will help you understand how to choose and present research metrics effectively and responsibly. We will discuss the limitations and strengths of various metrics and the importance of using a range of evidence. We will also present some options for visualizing evidence in a clear and effective way that supports your case for promotion and/or tenure.

Citation Management

Zotero (60 minutes)

Description: Zotero is an open source citation management tool that allows users to collect, organize, and cite research. This workshop covers downloading, installing the tool, collecting citations, and incorporating citations into your writing. 

Audience: faculty, graduate students, undergraduate students

Instructor: Ted Polley

Copyright

Copyright and your Thesis or Dissertation (60 minutes)

Description: This workshop addresses the basics of copyright for graduate students. Including: how and when to get permission to use a work in your thesis and how to own your copyrights while sharing your working online.

Audience: graduate students

Instructor: Jere Odell

Fair Use for Educators

Description: This workshop gives you the skills to confidently reuse works for in-person and online education. In addition to the basics of copyright & fair use for educators, this workshop introduces the Creative Commons license structure and resources for finding reusable educational resources for the classroom.

Audience: Faculty

Instructor: Jere Odell

Digital Humanities

Introduction to Text Encoding: Text Encoding with XML and Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines

Description: Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines (TEI) are a standard that defines an XML format for textual materials represented in a digital form. TEI is now the accepted standard for text-encoding and digital humanities projects and is the preferred standard for granting agencies like the National Endowment for Humanities. This workshop provides attendees with a hands-on introduction to basic text encoding with TEI and doing research in the TEI Guidelines to provide context and support visualization of features of text relevant to humanities scholars.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructor: Caitlin Pollock

*Pre-requisites: This workshop assumes attendees have some basic knowledge of XML or other markup languages, like HTML. Prior to the workshop, attendees can go over basic XML using the "A Gentle Introduction to XML", from the TEI Consortium. 

Text Mining for Beginners: OpenRefine

Description: OpenRefine is a data wrangling tool that can be used to “clean” messy data, transform data, and query APIs and return the results. In this workshop, participants will learn to text mine a historical textual document and extract data from an XML file. Participants will gain experience with cleaning up messy data in the form of text and transforming it into a clean, simple, and easily read (by humans and computers) format. OpenRefine will allow you to work with data with no computer programming skills in a user interface. This workshop will include hands-on exercises.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructor: Caitlin Pollock

*Pre-requisites: No computer programming skills are necessary; however, comfort with quickly transitioning to and from computer programs will be beneficial.

Getting Started with Omeka

Description: Omeka is a platform that supports the publication of digital exhibits. In this workshop, participants will learn how to create collections, develop the metadata for individual items, and the different settings of Omeka. This workshop will also discuss Omeka plugins and participants will get experience with one plugin, Neatline, which provides mapping and timeline support for collections.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructor: Caitlin Pollock

*Pre-requisites: Materials to work with will be provided to participants. However, participants are encouraged to bring their own materials. No experience is required.

Creating Interactive Data Visualization using JavaScript for the Humanities

Description: Interested in learning how to make interactive maps, content sliders, and slide shows? This workshop will provide a gentle introduction to JavaScript, which along with HTML and CSS, is one of the core technologies of the World Wide Web. JavaScript is responsible for interactive components on webpages. Participants, besides learning how to read and write simple JavaScript, will gain experience with well-known JavaScript libraries and will learn how to search for JavaScript projects on GitHub and implement them on projects.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructor: Caitlin Pollock

*Pre-requisites: Basic knowledge of HTML. Participants should come with GitHub account already set up. Instructions for setting up a GitHub can be found here: https://github.com/join

Open Access

Choosing a journal? Think. Check. Submit. (60 minutes)

Description: Learn about your options for open access publishing and factors to consider when selecting an article for your journal for your next article.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or graduate students

Instructor: Jere Odell

Open Knowledge

Getting Started with Wikipedia (60 minutes)

Description: Would you like to contribute to Wikipedia? Have you thought about ways to include Wikipedia editing in the classroom? This workshop will get you started. Participants will create accounts (if needed) and will make initial edits to a Wikipedia entry.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructors: Jere Odell or Mairelys Lemus-Rojas

Getting Started with Wikidata (60 minutes)

Description: What is Wikidata? If you'd like a search tool that can build a map of every covered bridge in Indiana … Wikidata is for you? Learn how to use and contribute open, linked online data.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructors: Jere Odell or Mairelys Lemus-Rojas

Research Data Management & Sharing

Developing an operational Data Management Plan (60 minutes)

Description: A data management plan is more than a funder mandate. An operational DMP can be an effective tool for streamlining research processes and improving communication across teams. In this session, we will introduce you to the elements of an operational DMP and guide you in choosing those most relevant to your research needs.

Audience: Lead or Principle Investigators, Lab Managers, or research teams

Instructors: Heather Coates, Erin Foster

*Pre-requisites: Attendees should be actively engaged in research

Note: This session can be adapted to specific disciplines or audiences. Advance notice is required for customization.

Good record-keeping in Research: Documenting, Describing, Defining (60 minutes)

Description: Good research record keeping is crucial for validating published results, building on former lines of research, and saving your future self lots of headache. This session will introduce best practices for creating good research documentation, including examples of effective records in a variety of formats.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructors: Heather Coates, Erin Foster

*Pre-requisites: Attendees should be actively engaged in research

Note: This session can be adapted to specific disciplines or audiences. Advance notice is required for customization.

Data sharing and availability: Know your options (60 minutes)

Description: Does your publisher require you to make the data underlying your article available? Does your funder encourage or require you to share the data resulting from your award? Are you interested in making your data openly available to enable validation, replication, or reproducibility? Are you interested in exploring the benefits of practicing open science/research? This session will describe the range of technology and support available at IU and beyond for sharing research data and other related products.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructors: Heather Coates, Erin Foster

*Pre-requisites: Attendees should be actively engaged in research

Note: This session can be adapted to specific disciplines or audiences. Advance notice is required for customization.

Data retention at IUPUI (60 minutes)

Description: Data are a crucial part of the scholarly record. In this session, we will introduce key strategies for keeping your data safe during the life of your project and beyond. We will document the workflow for a particular project to identify the key points for taking snapshots of your data (and associated record). We will describe options for protecting and archiving those snapshots using available infrastructure at IU and beyond.

Audience: Faculty, staff, or students

Instructors: Heather Coates, Erin Foster

*Pre-requisites: Attendees should be actively engaged in research

Note: This session can be adapted to specific disciplines or audiences. Advance notice is required for customization.

The role of data management in research integrity (60-90 minutes)

Description: What are the practical steps that researchers can take to ensure that their research data has integrity? How can you translate legal and ethical requirements into tasks that can be integrated into your research process? This session will introduce practical strategies and best practices for managing research data that enable validated and replication or reproducibility of your findings. We will also discuss ways to integrate these practices into ongoing research projects.

Audience: Graduate students or capstone students

Instructors: Heather Coates, Erin Foster

*Pre-requisites: Attendees should be actively engaged in research

Note: This session can be adapted to specific disciplines or audiences. Advance notice is required for customization.

Updated Dec 10, 2018 by hcoates