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Services

The library should establish, promote, maintain and evaluate a range of quality services that support the college's mission and goals. The library should provide competent and prompt assistance for its users. Hours of access to the library should be reasonable and convenient for its users. Reference and other special assistance should be available at times when the college's primary users most need them. When academic programs are offered at off-campus sites, library services should be provided in accordance with the "ACRL Guidelines for Distance Learning Library Services".

  1. How well does the library establish, promote, maintain and evaluate a range of quality services that support the academic program of the college and optimal library use?
  2. Are reference, circulation, and government document services designed to enable users to take full advantage of the resources available to them?
  3. How do student and faculty expectations affect library services?
  4. How well do interlibrary loan and document delivery services support the needs of qualified users?
  5. Does the library maintain hours of access consistent with reasonable demand?
  6. What library services are provided for programs at off-campus sites? How are the needs of users and their satisfaction determined at those sites?
  7. How are students and faculty informed of library services?
  8. Does the library maintain and utilize quantitative and qualitative measurements of its ability to serve its users?

1. How well does the library establish, promote, maintain and evaluate a range of quality services that support the academic program of the college and optimal library use?

Since the University Library's mission statement parallels that of the campus mission statement, the library goals and objectives are closely linked to the academic programs. The University Library has worked in a team environment since 1996. Originally these teams centered around functional lines. Since 2000, four specific teams were created to respond to the needs of the various schools: Liberal Arts/Music; Science/Engineering & Technology/Nursing; Professional Programs; University College. These teams address instructional, special reference, and collection development issues for the corresponding Schools. Likewise, librarians from these teams help staff the general reference desk. The Team Leaders or designees attend the Library Committee meetings of the various faculties and convey concerns to the team members and library administration. All librarians also serve as subject librarians to departments and programs. A librarian is also housed in the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). This librarian is both an additional resource for instructors when they contact the CTL and is a conduit about instructional information and training opportunities to the librarians. The University Library's services may be established or altered by in-put from any or all of these sources of interaction with faculty and students.

Some avenues for promotion of library services are:
a) New faculty orientation participation
b) Faculty services packets are distributed each semester
c) Workshops for faculty, usually done in cooperation with CTL
d) School listservs
e) Library liaison activities
f) Campus listservs
g) Library tours of campus and external groups such as high school students. In 2001/02 75 tours were given involving approximately 620 people, and there were 123 self-guided tours recorded involving about 175 people
h) Gateway Magazine - a publication of the University Library aimed primarily at a community audience, but this is also distributed on campus.
i) Participation in library or information literacy instruction in learning communities and other academic classes.

The campus mission involves the maximization of the use of technology in teaching and learning. The University Library takes an aggressive approach to providing quality services to complement this approach. Some initiatives which reflect this philosopy are:
a) Electronic reserves - the University Library was a pioneer in providing this service
b) Providing electronic delivery of digital documents for Interlibrary Loan
c) Experimenting with online, interactive reference software
d) SFX
e) Digital library resources tool set - developed for use with the campus digital course delivery system
f) Image management software
g) Wireless network coordinated with that of the University College
h) Online Philanthropic Studies Index

Every effort is made to provide our users with up-to-date, robust, sophisticated resources and software that are comfortable to use.

The University Library is also extremely important as a physical place for study and interaction for an urban, commuting student body. There are over 30 group study rooms. There are over 300 computers with both PC and MAC platforms available to the public. The library is open 97 hours / week with some extended hours before final exams. One high quality laser printer is available for every 20 computers. High quality laser color printing is also available for a minimal cost. The library computers are replaced on a life cycle of approximately 4 years within base budget funding. To date charges are not being made for most printing. In 2001 there were 4,600,000 sheets of paper purchased for public printing. Both library resources and computer application software packages are available on library computers. Computer software versions are synchronized with campus standards. Older computers are available for those who just want to use e-mail services. The library computers are always among the newest on campus both in terms of hardware and operating systems. The technology support staff of the library has risen from 2 to 14 since 1993. In addition the computer areas on the second and third floors are staffed by part-time computer consultants for all of the open library hours.

The two library computer classrooms, one traditional classroom, and various larger group rooms, all with full computing access, are used for library instruction as well as for some classes, library or campus programming, and selected classes in the Department of Library and Information Science and the Philanthropy program. The meeting rooms serve a core need for many campus and related community groups.

A union catalog reflects the holdings of the entire Indiana University system. All circulating items are available to any campus requestor. All libraries with processing units contribute to maintenance of the Union Catalog, IUCAT. The University Library works also very closely with the professional school libraries on campus to maximize budgetary dollars and resources available to the campus.

Evaluation of services is conducted in a variety of ways including annual satisfaction and use surveys. Since 1999 the University Library has been conducting an annual survey of library users as they exited the building. The users surveyed expressed an average overall satisfaction rate of 70.7% in the last 3 years with the highest rating being 2001 at 75%. The rating of satisfaction for the day's visit was 95% for 2001. This general satisfaction is also borne out by the Office of Planning and Institutional Improvement's campus Surveys for Faculty and Surveys for Students. The University Library survey also identifies the reason for the library visit by users and will serve as a guide for more in-depth study of library usage.

Specific use statistics are also gathered for a number of areas, e.g.:
a) gate count statistics for numbers of visitors per day
b) journal usage by title based on shelving statistics
c) journal usage by title based on reports from vendors of electronic journals
d) inter-library loan activity based on reports from OCLC, our main bibliographic utility
e) use of electronic reserves
f) use of library public computers

We are hoping in the very near future to expand our knowledge of the use of our collection by information taken from our online library system. Permission has been granted to the local unit this year to begin the generation of reports from the system for our campus.

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2. Are reference, circulation, and government document services designed to enable users to take full advantage of the resources available to them?

Librarians, graduate student assistants, or specialized full-time staff man the main reference desks 92% of open hours for in-person, phone or e-mail consultation. These hours are based on highest interaction times with heaviest staffing matching recorded need. Reference services are also available in the Philanthropic Studies Library from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays; appointments may be made for evening and weekend consultations with the reference librarian. The Special Collections and Archives area also maintains reference service from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays with evening hours Tuesday and Wednesday as well as 9 a.m. to 12 noon on Saturday to meet the needs of commuting students and researchers.

The main reference desk has prominent signage and is located in the center of a library section containing a cluster of high-end work stations, microform reader/printers, current periodicals, and the reference collection. Research consultations for any extended research problem are available by appointment with specific subject librarians. In-person reference requests followed the national trend of decline in previous years, but in the last reporting year, this figure began to rise again by 03.6% for an average of 1,011 questions a week.

During the past two years University Libraries has also experimented with interactive online reference software that allows sharing of Web pages as well as a chat session. A new version of this software will be initiated in the fall of 2002. Recent studies indicate academic library users work primarily from their offices or home, and this avenue of reference service would enable the library to reach more users at their preferred place of operations.

Government information services are integrated into general reference services. The University Library maintains a selective Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) collection with a selection rate of 42.65% of all available item numbers. The IU School of Law Library on campus also has a depository collection and the Indiana State Library, with full depository status, is within a few city blocks of the University. There are also several other selective depository collections in the city. Whenever possible, the University Libraries chooses digital forms of delivering government data in accordance with our general philosophy of access. The University Libraries also provides access to ERIC documents through its electronic resources.

Access Services maintains the circulation service desks as well as Web-based services. Some of the latter services are:
a) electronic reserves (the University Library received the Computer World Smithsonian Award in April 2000 for its efforts in this area)
b) user-initiated recalls and renewals through the online catalog (fall 2002)
c) online renewals and inter-library loan request forms

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3. How do student and faculty expectations affect library services?

Student expectations have played a major role in the reshaping of circulation and reserve serves. Today, in response to student recommendations, over 90% of all reserve readings are available over the Internet, avoiding the limits imposed by a physical collection. Loan periods and renewals have been expanded over the last couple of years to make it easier for students to obtain and use the materials they need.

Faculty concerns are viewed very seriously and responded to as best as possible. One such complaint that finally was recently resolved concerned inter-library loan time periods for in-system loans. Faculty have complained for many years about the discrepancy of the loan period for materials borrowed from the Bloomington campus directly as compared to inter-library loan. This discrepancy has now been eliminated. As faculty expectations increase regarding delivery of resources or services through digital technologies, the University Library has responded or in some instances led the way.

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4. How well do interlibrary loan and document delivery services support the needs of qualified users?

Over the past five years, on the average, the University Library has been able to provide its users with 70% of the materials they have requested through interlibrary loan. In the fiscal year 2001/02, the University Library submitted 10,348 borrowing requests and received 31,012 lending requests for our materials. Interlibrary loans are processed for any student, staff, or faculty member.
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5. Does the library maintain hours of access consistent with reasonable demand?

Campus student surveys have consistently ranked satisfaction with library hours highly in comparison to other campus services or activities. The respondents have also ranked the importance of the library hours higher than many other elements surveyed.

University Library is open 97 hours a week.

Basic hours are:

  • Sunday 10 a.m. - 11 p.m.
  • Monday 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
  • Tuesday 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
  • Wednesday 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
  • Thursday 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
  • Friday 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
  • Saturday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
  • There are some extended hours before final exams.

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    6. What library services are provided for programs at off-campus sites? How are the needs of users and their satisfaction determined at those sites?

    With very few exceptions, off-campus site program participants have the same access to the electronic resources, including electronic reserves, provided by the library as do on-campus users. The needs of these programs are conveyed to the library for the most part through the faculty in these programs. A formal satisfaction survey instrument is not in place for this feature currently.
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    7. How are students and faculty informed of library services?

    Signage, handouts and web pages inform our faculty and students of new and on-going services. In addition, many of these services are mentioned in the instructional session provided by the subject librarians during class time instruction in learning communities and other courses. Each summer a Faculty Guide to using the University Library is sent to each full and part-time instructor detailing new services and changes in services for the library. Subject / school librarian liaisons stay in communication with schools and/or departments through faculty library committees or directly with their academic unit counterpart. Various campus communications are also used, e.g., the campus listserv, "JAG News," "Campus Scape," or the student newspaper, "Sagamore."

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    8. Does the library maintain and utilize quantitative and qualitative measurements of its ability to serve its users?

    The IUPUI University Library maintains numerous quantitative data. Much of this is reported annually and combined with other Indiana University libraries for reporting to the Association of College and Research Libraries. Qualitative measurements has centered around general satisfaction surveys of students and faculty done at the campus level, and a local satisfaction survey of library visitors started in 1999. Use measurements have been collected for journals, both paper and electronic. Additional use studies will be conducted this year from circulation and inter-library loan data to assist in ascertaining those areas of collection strengths and weaknesses in relation to our academic needs.
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    Last updated by lcalvert on 03/18/2013