Lucy Taggart

 

Lucy Taggart

 

The daughter of Indianapolis mayor Thomas Taggart, Lucy Taggart served as a board member of the Herron School of Art from 1915 to 1943, and as an unpaid professor at Herron from 1931 to 1943.  She taught painting and portraiture to countless students.  As a member of the Board, Taggart helped to steer the direction of the school and sat on an important committee to find Herron School of Art's first director.  The board hired Donald Mattison in 1933.

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Last updated by maeowen on 11/23/2014

Edna Mann Shover

 

Edna Mann Shover

 

Edna Mann Shover served as principal of the Herron Art School from 1921 to 1933.  During these years, Herron was a freestanding school and was not affiliated with Indiana University.  As principal, Shover guided Herron through a period of financial hardship.  Funding for the school dramatically decreased during World War I, and Shover helped the school recover profits by adding practical courses in drafting, map-making, and educational therapy for wounded soldiers.  She later saw the school through hard times following the deaths of several prominent board members and resignation of Herron director Harold Brown.

Last updated by maeowen on 11/23/2014

Clara Hester

 

Clara Hester

 

Clara Hester served as the first director of the Indiana University Normal College.  She joined the staff of Normal College in 1922, and became a full professor in 1924.  From 1934-1941, she served as vice president of the college.  The Normal College was absorbed by Indiana University in 1941, and Hester became Assistant Dean of the Indiana University School of Physical Education.  She was later named Director of the Indiana University Normal College.

As Assistant Dean and Director of the Normal College, Hester established IU's physical education curriculum at IUPUI.  She was also a pioneer in methods of physical education, and in 1933 pioneered camping as a part of physical education.  She took summer camps to Camp Brosius in Wisconsin.  Hester was a charter member of the Indiana section of the American Camping Association and served a term as president of the Indiana State Physical Education Association.  She retired as director in 1963 and continued teaching until 1968.

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Winifred Kahmann

Winifred Kahmann

 

Kahmann was hired in 1924 by the Indianapolis Junior League to establish an Occupational Therapy Program at Riley Hospital for Children.  The Occupational Therapy Program became a free-standing school at IUPUI in 1934, and she served as Director of Occupational Therapy and Physio-Therapy for all IU hospitals from 1934 to 1959.  Kahmann also coordinated the IU cerebral palsy clinic and established a burn clinic.  Kahmann was a pioneer occupational therapist and many students traveled to IU in order to study under her direction. 

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Margaret Cook

Margaret Cook

 

Margaret Cook was an Associate Professor of French at the IU Extension campus and later IUPUI from 1946 to 1973.  Cook was one of the first foreign language professors at the Extension campus, and in the 1940s and 1950s she was highly influential in the growth of the school's foreign language program.  She developed much of the early curriculum for the program and taught courses in both French and Spanish.  Cook also pioneered special courses in foreign language geared towards Americans planning to travel abroad.

With the opening of Cavanaugh Hall on IUPUI's campus in 1971, Cook developed a modern foreign language laboratory and designed the school's new French curriculum.  She served as department chair of Foreign Languages from 1971 to 1972.  Cook retired in 1973 and died in 1984.  She deeded the department of Foreign Languages funds to establish its first study abroad scholarship.

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Gertrude Heberlein

Gertrude Heberlein

 

Heberlein came to the extension center in 1924 as a part-time stenographer.  In 1926, she became the office assistant to Mary Orvis.  Heberlein, like Orvis, would become a prominent figure in the early years of the extension center's work.  She became well-known for her willingness to help wherever needed, which, over the years included the center's bookstore and library.  After Orvis's retirement from her position directing the extension office, Heberlein became acting director of the office for one year before a replacement was hired.

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Mary Orvis

Mary Orvis

 

A well-known figure in the early days of Indiana University's presence in Indianapolis, Orvis started working for Indiana University in 1916 as a secretary to the director of the university's summer school program.  From 1918 to 1924, she held the title of secretary the IU Indianapolis extension office located in the Bobbs Merrill building in downtown Indianapolis.  In 1921, Robert E. Cavanaugh became the director of IU's Extension Division and he unofficially charged Orvis with running the Indianapolis office.  She was considered to be the "officer-in-charge," and in 1924, her position title officially changed to executive secretary.  Orvis did everything from planning courses to overseeing administrative functions. 

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Cordelia Hoeflin

Cordelia Hoeflin

 

Cordelia Hoeflin served as Director of the Training School for Nurses from May 1933 to January 1946.  In 1928, Hoeflin began working at Riley Hospital for Children as Assistant Superintendent of Nurses.  She served in this position until 1930, at which time she left to complete coursework in hospital administration.  Hoeflin returned to IU in May 1933 as the new Director of the Training School for Nurses.  

Hoeflin led the Training School for Nurses through the Great Depression and World War II.  During this time, she increased entrance requirements to include one year of college work (1937) and maintained former director Ethel Clarke's strict sense of discipline among students.  In 1941 the Training School for Nurses appeared on the first list of accredited school of nursing sponsored by the National League of Nursing Education. 

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Josephine Hull

Josephine Hull

 

Josephine Hull became Acting Director of the Training School for Nurses following Ethel Clarke's departure in 1931.  She served as Acting Director until May 1933.  Hull had previously been the Assistant Director of the training school from 1930 to 1931. 

Hull spent her tenure as Acting Director ensuring that the school continued to uphold the strict educational standards put into place by Ethel Clarke.  To this end, she added curriculum in chemistry, massage, and ward management.  Her efforts ensured that students obtained the best education possible in the interim years following Clarke's departure.

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Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Ethel P. Clarke

Ethel P. Clarke

 

Ethel Clarke replaced Alice Fitzgerald as director of the Training School for Nurses when she left in 1914.  Clarke served as director of the Training School for Nurses from 1915 to 1931.  She continued Fitzgerald's efforts to grow and establish the program, and eventually oversaw the construction of Ball Nurses' Residence, the first official home of the Training School for Nurses.  Before Ball Nurses' Residence opened, students lived in cottages in the neighborhoods surrounding Long Hospital.  Ball offered nursing students safer housing, a more communal environment, and a home for faculty offices, dining facilities, and exercise facilities. 

Clarke also created a nurses' alumnae association and brought a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau honorary society to campus.  Her presence at the Training School for Nurses truly defined the early period of nursing education at IU.

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Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011