Josephine Hull

Josephine Hull

 

Josephine Hull became Acting Director of the Training School for Nurses following Ethel Clarke's departure in 1931.  She served as Acting Director until May 1933.  Hull had previously been the Assistant Director of the training school from 1930 to 1931. 

Hull spent her tenure as Acting Director ensuring that the school continued to uphold the strict educational standards put into place by Ethel Clarke.  To this end, she added curriculum in chemistry, massage, and ward management.  Her efforts ensured that students obtained the best education possible in the interim years following Clarke's departure.

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Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Ethel P. Clarke

Ethel P. Clarke

 

Ethel Clarke replaced Alice Fitzgerald as director of the Training School for Nurses when she left in 1914.  Clarke served as director of the Training School for Nurses from 1915 to 1931.  She continued Fitzgerald's efforts to grow and establish the program, and eventually oversaw the construction of Ball Nurses' Residence, the first official home of the Training School for Nurses.  Before Ball Nurses' Residence opened, students lived in cottages in the neighborhoods surrounding Long Hospital.  Ball offered nursing students safer housing, a more communal environment, and a home for faculty offices, dining facilities, and exercise facilities. 

Clarke also created a nurses' alumnae association and brought a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau honorary society to campus.  Her presence at the Training School for Nurses truly defined the early period of nursing education at IU.

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Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Alice Fitzgerald

Alice Fitzgerald

 

Alice Fitzgerald served as the first director of the Indiana University Training School for Nurses from 1913 to 1914.  During her year in Indianapolis, Fitzgerald literally built the Training School for Nurses.  She designed the school's curriculum, hired its first faculty, ordered supplies for the training school and for Long Hospital, and oversaw the first class of five nursing students.  In its early years, the nursing school was based in the newly opened Robert Long Hospital.

 

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Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Edna Henry

Edna Henry

 

Edna Henry was the founder and first director of the Social Service Department at IU Medical Center.  She served in this capacity from 1911 to 1921.  Henry was recruited by Indiana University President William Lowe Bryan to establish the new department.  A well-known social worker, she had previously founded Associated Charities of Anderson.

At IU, Henry organized the new department and taught courses.  She also helped to found the Indianapolis Advisory Committee of the IU Social Services Department, a group that oversaw dispensary work.  Henry also served as the first president of the American Association of Hospital Social Workers and the First treasurer of the Marion County Tuberculosis Association.

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Edith Schuman, M.D.

Lillian Mueller, M.D.

Jane Merrill Ketcham, M.D.

 

Jane Merrill Ketcham, M.D.

 

Dr. Ketcham was one of the first female faculty members of the Indiana University School of Medicine.  She began teaching there in 1912, four years after the school hired its first female faculty member.  Ketcham taught at the school for many years before finally being promoted to Clinical Professor of Medicine in 1934.

Ketcham was know for her charitable work, and offered free healthcare to the poor.  Ketcham served as a house doctor at a home for unwed mothers and offered her services to many other worthy causes.  She was also well-known for her efforts to provide public health assistance in the face of natural disasters.  Ketcham headed medical relief efforts to flood victims of Indianapolis's 1913 flood.  She manned a relief center at Manual Training High School and assisted many needy victims.  She also joined an expedition by boat to Jeffersonville in 1933 to search for smallpox victims.  Ketcham retired in 1953.

 

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Amelia Keller, M.D.

Amelia Keller, M.D.

Dr. Keller was the first female faculty member at the Indiana University School of Medicine.  She taught at the school from 1908 to 1919 as an Associate Professor of Diseases of Children.  Keller was also one of the first female physicians practicing in Indianapolis, having started her practice in the city in 1895.

Like many professional women of her day, Keller was a feminist.  When she married Dr. Eugene Buehler in 1899, Keller did not take his name and instead continued to refer to herself by her maiden name.  Keller served as the first president of the Women's Franchise League (1911-1917), and also served as Vice President of the Indiana Federation of Women's Clubs.  She edited the suffrage column of The Citizen magazine for many years.  Keller was also active in many Indianapolis-area women's organizations.

 

Last updated by maeowen on 10/31/2011

Maude Arthur, M.D.

Founding Mothers

Founding Mothers


IUPUI is home to several education programs that date to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  These institutions include medical, dental, nursing, physical education, law and art schools.  While they began as independent operations, the institutions were later acquired by Indiana University and became a part of IUPUI when it opened in 1969.  Women played a vital role in the development of these early schools.  They worked as administrators, nurses, physicians, and teachers.  These "Founding Mothers" were responsible for helping to build the foundations of IUPUI's academic excellence. 

 

The Early Schools of IUPUI 

Last updated by maeowen on 10/30/2011