Digital Collections

500 Festival Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
The 500 Festival archival collection is held by the organization in Indianapolis. This digitized collection was created to share the 500 Festival events and traditions with the community.The online collection includes photos and documents from past and present 500 Festival events and programs.
Athenaeum Damenverein & Women's Auxiliary Records, 1876-2007 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
In 1893 members of the Indianapolis German-American community living on the south side of Indianapolis broke away from the Indianapolis Socialer Turnverein to form the Indianapolis South Side Turners. This organization stressed physical fitness and the preservation of German culture and was a social and cultural center for German-Americans in the southern part of the city. In 1900 the South Side Turners built their hall, equipped with a gymnasium and meeting rooms, at 306 Prospect Street. The group sold the building in 1977 and today is based in German Park on South Meridian Street.
Athenaeum Turners Records, 1880-2002 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
The Athenaeum Turners is a German-American organization founded in 1851 as the Indianapolis Turngemeinde. Its original emphasis was on promoting physical fitness and intellectual development, advancing the political interests of German-Americans, and preserving German culture. The Athenaeum, the Turners' home since its opening in 1893, served as a gathering place for the Indianapolis German-American community, and members of the Athenaeum Turners were prominent leaders in the political, business, educational, and cultural life of the city.
Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site is an independently-funded nonprofit museum dedicated to preserving and sharing Harrison’s presidential legacy and largely hidden collection of more than 10,000 historical items. The collection is composed of original Harrison family artifacts and accessioned artifacts of national significance. 
Flanner House (Indianapolis, Ind.) Records, 1936-1992 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
The Indiana Historical Society (IHS) and Indiana University/Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) collaborated to establish this digital project pertaining to Flanner House. The approximately 5,000 digitized objects consist of photographic, manuscript, artifact, and printed images from the IHS and IUPUI Flanner House collections and several items related to Flanner House from various collections at the two repositories.
H. Roll McLaughlin Collection Supported by Herron Art Library
This collection demonstrates Roll McLaughlin's work preserving Indiana’s historic architecture.
Hamilton County History Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
Originally entitled Hamilton County in 1900: Through a Young Person's Lens, this collection includes the photographs of Earl Brooks (1883-1968), who acquired a camera as a young man and took pictures between approximately 1897 and 1904 of friends, teachers, the countryside and events in central Indiana, California, Kentucky and Ohio.  Photographs of the Hamilton County Township Schools taken between 1892 and 1909 are also included. At the turn of the century, County School Superintendent Ellis A. Hutchens announced his wish to have a photograph taken of every Hamilton County school and here are 68 of those photographs. Also included is the Inter-State Directory Company's directory of Noblesville and Hamilton County Gazetteer for the years 1907-1908, a countywide residential and business directory. These projects were made possible by a joint project between the Hamilton County Historical Society and the Hamilton East Public Library.
Herron Library Fine Press and Book Arts Collection Supported by Herron Art Library
The Herron Library is home to a growing and notable Fine Press / Book Arts collection approaching 1000 items.   Artist Books offer unique expressions of art that reflect the qualities, functions, and structure of the book.  They are creative works produced in a wide variety of structures, themes, materials, and mediums.   Artists’ books may be produced in small editions or as one-of-a-kind works of art – all with the intent to be interactive, intimate, works of art mirroring personal, social, or ecological themes.  The Herron Library is home to many important contemporary book artists such as Julie Chen, Rebecca Goodale, Bea Nettles, as well as many other acclaimed artists.
Indiana Farm Security Administration Photographs Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
The U.S. Farm Security Administration took 678 photographs with captions in Indiana from 1935 to 1943. These photos cover the Ohio River flood (1937), resettlement communities of Decatur Homesteads and Wabash and Deshee Farms (1938), and U. S. Army Chaplain School at Fort Ben Harrison (1943). Most of the photos are primarily concerned with rural and traditional agricultural life. There are very few industrial shots and no photos of major industries. The only major city in Indiana photographed was Indianapolis, including photos around Monument Circle, the Greyhound Bus Station, and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Indiana Historic Architecture Slide Collection Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
A Library Services Technology Grant allowed IUPUI to begin digitization of Indiana Landmarks' slide collection, now making it available to the public. The collection contains images from the early 1960s through present day and captures historic architecture throughout the state. Educators will find the collection useful in documenting architectural styles and Indiana history. Old house enthusiasts will find ideas for paint colors, restoration techniques, and inspiration.
Indiana Medical History Museum - Wishard Scrapbook Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
University Library collaborated with the Indiana Medical History Museum to make this scrapbook, which Dr. William Niles Wishard was heavily involved in the creation of, available in digital format. This treasure, like many of the artifacts on display at the Indiana Medical History Museum, is a window into the history of medicine in Indiana and an introduction to some of the past prominent figures in the Indianapolis Medical Society.
Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission Supported by Herron Art Library
The Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission Collection contains information and images of Indianapolis properties located within designated historic districts.
Indianapolis History Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
This collection includes a variety of Indianapolis related primary (with limited secondary) resources (photographs and text) dating from late 19th to mid 20th centuries.Example resources include:Indianapolis Power & Light Co. Distribution System Photograph collection, monographs on the history of Indiana such as, The Hoosiers published in 1916, several issue of the Free Soil Banner, and various published and unpublished city of Indianapolis scrapbooks.
Indianapolis Maennerchor Records, 1866-1990 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
The Indianapolis Maennerchor (men's choir), established in 1854 by German immigrants, is one of the oldest continuously active singing societies in the United States. The Maennerchor was an important organization in the early cultural life of Indianapolis, sponsoring musical events of national importance and bringing prominent singers and musicians to the city.
Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
The Indianapolis Motor Speedway boasts an enormous photographic collection with over 4 million negatives in its collection.  Together, IUPUI University Library and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway will digitize and create metadata for 6,000 negatives for the collection.  By providing online access to this collection, users will have the opportunity to view and search the collection that would otherwise have to be viewed by coming to the Speedway.
Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
The Indianapolis Neighborhood Resource Center (INRC) is a private nonprofit organization that offers training, technical assistance, and coaching to help grassroots neighborhood-based organizations throughout Marion County address issues that impact the quality of life in their neighborhoods. The resources provided by INRC helps to strengthen, develop, and empower neighborhoods.
Indianapolis South Side Turners Records, 1893-1956 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
In 1893 members of the Indianapolis German-American community living on the south side of Indianapolis broke away from the Indianapolis Socialer Turnverein to form the Indianapolis South Side Turners. This organization stressed physical fitness and the preservation of German culture and was a social and cultural center for German-Americans in the southern part of the city. In 1900 the South Side Turners built their hall, equipped with a gymnasium and meeting rooms, at 306 Prospect Street. The group sold the building in 1977 and today is based in German Park on South Meridian Street. These photographs are part of the Indianapolis South Side Turners Records held by the IUPUI University Library Ruth Lilly Special Collections and Archives.
Inland Steel Company Image Collection Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
Inland Steel Company, founded in 1893 in Chicago, arrived first in northwest Indiana, establishing its Indiana Harbor Works in 1901 in East Chicago, Indiana. A very large and important source of historical information about the local steel industry is the Inland Steel Company Photograph Collection housed in the Calumet Regional Archives at Indiana University Northwest. Inland Steel created a visual materials collection comprising over one million images, including prints, negatives, slides and transparencies. Select images from this huge collection are presented here for use by students, scholars, and the general public.
IUPUI Image Collection Supported by Special Collections
This collection of digital images visually represents IUPUI's history and development as a teaching facility, an academic institution, a continually transforming campus, and a group of ever growing students, faculty, and staff.
James Whitcomb Riley Collection Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
This digital collection celebrates the works of James Whitcomb Riley and is a valuable resource for students, teachers, and researchers in Indiana, throughout the country, and beyond. Livin' the life of Riley provides access to manuscripts, personal letters, photographs, early edition books, and artifacts that represent the Hoosier Poet. This is a collaborative effort between the Hancock Public Library, the Riley Old Home Society, the James Whitcomb Riley Museum Home, and IUPUI University Library and was made possible by an LSTA grant.
Jessie Groves Collection, 1915-1977 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
In 1915 Jessie Groves arrived in Indianapolis at the age of 21 to take a position as the Night Supervisor at Long Hospital on the campus of the fledgling Indiana University School of Medicine. She spent the rest of her nursing career at the IU Medical Center, retiring in the 1950s as the Operating Room Supervisor for both Long and Riley Hospitals. The collection consists mainly of candid photographs taken by Jessie over the course of her four decades at the Medical Center and an oral history completed when she was 83 years old looking back on her career.
Keystone View Company Lantern Slides Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
The Keystone View Company was the largest stereographic company in the world, specializing in national and international geographic and social science images.  The 488 slides in this digital collection include images from the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. They depict scenes from agricultural, industrial, commercial, urban, rural, transportation, nature, historical and daily life situation. Images date from the 1890s through the early twentieth century.
Neighborhood of Saturdays Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
“The Neighborhood of Saturdays” is a collaborative research project undertaken by the Department of Anthropology at IUPUI along with a number of community-based organizations, including the Concord Neighborhood Center, Etz Chaim Sephardic Congregation, the Southside Picnic Committee and the Babe Denny Neighborhood Organization.  Through oral history interviews and archival research, students are reconstructing a portrait of this unique Indianapolis neighborhood, located on the near Southside, that was once home to a range of immigrant groups as well as to significant populations of African-Americans and Appalachians.
Neil Matthew Photographs, 1940-1983 (Digital) Supported by Special Collections
This collection is a photographic documentary of scenes and places from the perspective of Neil E. Matthew, a professor of the Herron School of Art at IUPUI. He was a painter first while an undergraduate at Arizona State University. He then studied photography under Henry Holmes Smith at Indiana University. His photography, as described by its creator, is "the painter as photographic tourist." It is straight representational photography of the landscape and buildings seen during his travels.
Sports Car Club of America Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
Dating back to its inception in 1944, Sports Car Club of America has served as the United States’ most diverse motorsports organization. With competition in its DNA, SCCA is pleased to partner with the IUPUI Library to capture some of its proud photographic history for future members, motorsports enthusiasts and historians.
Tiananmen Square, 1989 Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
On April 15, 1989, Hu Yaobang, the ousted General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, died in Beijing. Thousands of ordinary people went to Tiananmen Square to mourn for his death. The college students in universities in Beijing soon turned mourning into a grassroots movement that called for political reform. This event spread to many cities in China and abroad as well and lasted for more than a month. The event ended abruptly with government’s killing of hundreds of ordinary citizens on June 4. This collection photographically documents the events of this tumultuous time.
Western Medicine in China, 1850-1950 Supported by Center for Digital Scholarship
A collection of photographs from Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Columbia University related to western medicine in China from 1800-1950 including the establishment and activities of hospitals, medical schools and other institutions in medical care, education and public health campaigns.